Late Night in Rosenberg

Walking around a small town after dark feels different than a big city. Things are so much quieter. With less traffic, fewer people and less noise, you feel as if you are the only one  in town. Or at least the only one awake.

The night a friend and I went exploring in Historic Downtown Rosenberg, things started out slow. But we met some fine folks at the OL’ RailRoad Cafe, a nice restaurant tucked away into a corner of the Vogelsang’s Antique Emporium.

The night a friend and I went exploring in Historic Downtown Rosenberg started out slow. But we met some fine folks at the OL' RailRoad Cafe, a nice restaurant tucked away into a corner of the Vogelsang's Antique Emporium. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

Old England

England is a country of diversity. And I”m not just talking about people. As you visit London and other towns, you find a wide variety in many things. Architecture is the first thing you notice. It has some of the most varied styles in one place I have ever seen. You can have a relatively new building alongside another that might be hundreds of years old. We were told that newer buildings might be those that replaced older buildings destroyed during the World War. Then add current construction alongside that too.

This is another example of diversity. Walking through Oxford, this little cemetery was right in the center of the commercial area, and only a short block away from the university. If it had historical significance, it was not obvious because it was run down and not taken care of for quite some time. 
 

Walking through Oxford, this little cemetery was right in the center of the commercial area, and only a short block away from the university. If it had historical significance, it was not obvious because it was run down and not taken care of for quite some time. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

Little Guys Go Fast Too

The Houston Grand Prix was fun for many reasons. Most people go to see the Grand Prix and Indy cars, but there is so much more for the spectator to enjoy. After the main events, the “slower” cars had a chance to run. I’m not familiar with all the classifications of the racers, but they come in all sizes, shapes and price ranges. You can find domestics like Mustangs,  Cameros and Corvettes alongside imports from Porches, Mazdas or Nissan. This race featured the really little cars like Mini-Coopers, Volkswagons and more. Whatever brand car you enjoy, there was probably one there racing.

Pure Muscle

Way back in college, I used to own a 1973 Mustang fastback. Though is wasn’t a true Mach 1, I had it decked out pretty good and even showed it at several car shows across the state. I often thought that if I were to purchase another one, it might be a ’69 or ’70 Mach 1 or Boss.

This 1970 Mustang Mach 1 exemplifies the muscle car era. Looking as if it just rolled off the showroom floor, it was just one of many quality vehicles I found at last year’s  Baytown, TX car show. Sitting in front of the O’Reilly sign just made it look more like an advertisement from a car magazine.

 

This 1970 Mustang Mach 1 exemplifies the muscle car era. Looking as if it just rolled off the showroom floor, it was just one of many quality vehicles I found at last year's  Baytown, TX car show. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

The Pensacola Lighthouse

I had seen it from a distance several times, and was in no hurry to visit it. But the Pensacola Lighthouse was a lot more interesting than I expected. The lightkeeper’s house as a small museum and the tower both are equally special. There is a lot of history to the building and like all good, old landmarks, has a haunted tale or two to brag about. The walk to the top is not too bad and the view and breeze at the top make it well worth your trouble. 

When you finish with your visit at the National Naval Aviation Museum about a block away, swing by the lighthouse for a quick visit. We were there in October, so if you look closely, you might see a ghost on the second story porch.
 

The Pensacola Lighthouse reaches to the sky and is a great landmark day or night.

The Pensacola Lighthouse Light

A lighthouse is one of those buildings that everyone likes. They stand out in a crowd and really makes the place shine. You know what I mean. Living along the Gulf coast, we don’t see many lighthouses. But during our last visit to Florida, my family visited the Pensacola Lighthouse that sits on the  Pensacola aval Air Station (NAS)

There has been a lighthouse in that area since 1823. The new, and current, tower is 150 feet tall, and sits on a 40-foot bluff located on the NAS, placing the light 190 feet above sea level. It still remains an active aid to navigation. 

This view is at the top of the tower, looking up into the lens assembly. It slowly rotates, even during the day, so I had to be fast taking a multiple exposure HDR sequence.
 

This view of the Pensacola Lighthouse is at the top of the tower, looking up into the lens assembly. It slowly rotates, even during the day, so I had to be fast taking a multiple exposure HDR sequence. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

A Pool of Light

When we stopped in East Bernard on the way home from taking some star photos, I wasn’t quite sure what we were going to take photos of. But, I considered it a challenge to find something. Of course, the more I looked, the more possibilities I saw. After everything was done and I looked at the photos a few days later, some “worked” while others didn’t.

Except for a passing train or car or two, the night was so quiet and still in this small country town. This intersection bathed in the glow of a single street light represents  how that moment felt in the early morning hours.
 

Except for a passing train or car or two, the night was so quiet and still in this small country town. This intersection bathed in the glow of a single street light represents  how that moment felt in the early morning hours. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.