Bar-B-Q Neon

Very few things in life can catch your attention as fast as neon lights at night. There you are driving down the street when you see it. You can hardly keep from looking away from all those bright, glowing lights. For those of us that don’t live close to Las Vegas, you appreciate a nice display (any display) of the neon rainbow. 

This Pappa’s Bar-B-Q is in downtown Houston and is best experienced at night. Of course, the food is best experienced any time they’re open.
 

The neon lights of this Pappa's Bar-B-Q in downtown Houston is best experienced at night. Of course, the food is best experienced any time they're open. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

Simple, Yet Exquisite

Part of the draw of visiting a great museum is the attention to detail and the little things that make the exhibits stand out or look so special. It might be the dramatic lighting or maybe a realistic diorama. But it could be the absence of things, using simplicity as “standard” for the display. 

The simplicity of the Faberge display at the Houston Museum of Natural Science allows you to focus your full attention on the exquisite collection and the detail of each exhibit. In this case, the large Diamond Trellis Egg is on the left, while the Nobel Egg or “Snowflake Egg” is on the right.
 

The simplicity of the Faberge display at the Houston Museum of Natural Science allows you to focus your full attention on the exquisite collection and the detail of each exhibit. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

A Classy Impala

 Chevrolet Impalas are one of those classics that many people can’t picture at first. Most can recall the ’57 Chevy, Corvette and other iconic cars, but the Impala takes a back seat. That is, until you see one in person. They are just downright classy. This ’58 beauty was found at a recent outdoor auto show in Baytown, TX. 
 

 This classy 1958 Chevrolet Impala was found at a recent outdoor auto show in Baytown, TX. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

Dome of the Co-Cathedral of the Sacred Heart

The Co-Cathedral of the Sacred Heart is located in the shadow of downtown Houston. It replaced the older building when it opened in 2008. This is the top of the dome, sitting high atop the cathedral and only seen when standing at a distance. I have yet to see the church inside, but the photos I have seen says it would be a great place to shoot sometime.
 

The Co-Cathedral of the Sacred Heart is located close to downtown Houston. This is the top of the dome, sitting high atop the cathedral and only seen when standing at a distance. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

Normandy American Cemetery

On a bluff overlooking the Omaha Beach in Normandy, France is the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial. The cemetery site  covers 172 acres and contains the graves of 9,387 of our military dead, most of whom lost their lives in the D-Day landings and ensuing operations in World War II.

Like all other overseas American cemeteries in France for World War I and II, France has granted the United States a special, perpetual concession to the land occupied by the cemetery, free of any charge or any tax. This cemetery is managed by the American government and the U.S. flag flies over these soils.

Memorial Day is a time we set aside to remember the men and women who died while serving in the United States Armed Forces. I had the honor of visiting Arlington National Cemetery and last summer, the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial. It is a very humbling experience to walk among the graves of those who have sacrificed everything for the freedoms our country offers.

 

Memorial Day is a time we set aside to remember the men and women who died while serving in the United States Armed Forces. I've had the honor of visiting Arlington National Cemetery and last summer, the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial. It is a very humbling experience to walk among the graves of those who have sacrificed everything for the freedoms our country offers. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

Trinity Episcopal Church

Driving around town at night with a few friends can be a lot of fun, especially with cameras and tripods. After a recent zoo shoot, we ventured towards downtown Houston on Main Street and came across the Trinity Episcopal Church. This old church has a more European look than most churches in our area. 

I normally like to remove power wires from the sky, but the lines in front of this church are from the Houston Metrorail that runs down Main Street.
 

After a recent zoo shoot, we ventured towards downtown Houston on Main Street and came across the Trinity Episcopal Church. This old church has a more European look than most churches in our area. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

A Texas Size Rat

They say everything is bigger in Texas. And after seeing this rodent, I’m likely to believe it. Although this “Nutria” or “Coypu” is a probably closer to a beaver or otter in habits, it sure looks like a big rat. 

Nutria are large, web-footed rodents that are more agile in the water than on land. They live in burrows, or nests, never far from the water. Nutria may inhabit a riverbank or lakeshore, or dwell in the midst of wetlands. They are strong swimmers and can remain submerged for as long as five minutes.

Nutria (also called coypu) are varied eaters, most fond of aquatic plants and roots. They also feast on small creatures such as snails or mussels.

Nutria can be rather social animals and sometimes live in large colonies, reproducing prolifically.  

This nutria was one of many in McGovern Lake  in Hermann Park in Houston. They would swim along the ducks, who weren’t bothered by them at all. Even the large coy fish in the lake didn’t make a fuss when swam by overhead.
 

This nutria was one of many in McGovern Lake  in Hermann Park in Houston. They would swim along the ducks, who weren't bothered by them at all. Even the large coy fish in the lake didn't make a fuss when swam by overhead. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.