The Kelch Rocaille Egg

Happy Easter. This is my last egg for this Easter series. The Kelch Rocaille Egg by Fabergé is made of varicolored gold, platinum, rose cut diamonds, translucent green enamel and silk lining. The heart surprise is made of gold, rose-cut diamonds, rose and white enamel.

Made in 1902, Alexander Kelch gave the Faberge “Kelch Rocaille Egg” to his wife, Barbara, but paid for it with her money. This is the fifth in a series of seven eggs made for the industrialist Alexander Kelch.
 

The Kelch Rocaille Egg by Fabergé is made of varicolored gold, platinum, rose cut diamonds, translucent green enamel and silk lining. The heart surprise is made of gold, rose-cut diamonds, rose and white enamel. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

Diamond Trellis Egg

The Diamond Trellis Egg is carved from pale green jadeite and is enclosed in a lattice of rose-cut diamonds with gold mounts.  Made in 1892, this Egg originally had a base representing three cherubs holding the Egg, made of ivory, gold, rose-cut diamonds, enamel, ant brilliant diamonds. Part of the McFerrin Collection, it is on display at the Houston Museum of Natural Science this year. This Faberge Egg is a bit larger than a normal egg, measuring 10.8 cm.
 

Made in 1892, the Diamond Trellis Egg is carved from pale green jadeite and is enclosed in a lattice of rose-cut diamonds with gold mounts. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

 

The Egg with Peacocks Outside

Not to be confused with the famous Peacock Egg ( it had a miniature peacock inside that you could wind up and it would spread it’s feathers) this Fabergé Egg has peacocks as part of the outside design. It’s hard to appreciate the amount of detail that went into many of eggs, both in jewels and the precious metals, until you take a really closer look.
 

Not to be confused with the famous Peacock Egg ( it had a miniature peacock inside that you could wind up and it would spread it's feathers) this Fabergé Egg has peacocks as part of the outside design. It's hard to appreciate the amount of detail that went into many of eggs, both in jewels and the precious metals, until you take a really closer look. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

Fabergé Comes to Houston

Just in time for Easter, I thought today’s image and the next several days might be appropriate for this week.

Until the end of this year, the Houston Museum of Natural Science has on display many of the famous Fabergé collection. This collection brings the splendor and extravagance of late 19th and early 20th century Imperial Russia. HMNS says “The House of Fabergé designed the renowned Imperial Easter Eggs for the Romanov family, as well as an array of objets d’art, luxurious gifts, and practical items for the wealthy patrons of Europe. Visitors can glimpse this grandeur in a special exhibition of Fabergé from the McFerrin Collection. Featuring more than 350 objects, highlights include 2 Fabergé eggs recently added to the collection—the breathtaking Diamond Trellis Imperial Egg and one of the celebrated Kelch Eggs.”

I was allowed to take part in a photographer’s evening of shooting without the normal crowds. The problem was all the other photographers (insert smiley face). I spent so much of what time we had shooting, I didn’t read as much of the information as I would have liked. Most of the items were very small and to see the detail, a macro lens had to be used. 

The Houston Museum of Natural Science has on display many of the famous Fabergé collection, bringing the splendor and extravagance of late 19th and early 20th century Imperial Russia. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

The Cheap Seats

A night at Constellation Field watching a baseball game is a fun night for everyone. Like any good baseball stadium, there is great food and beverages, and plenty of fans rooting for the hometeam. Being a minor league staduim, everything is a bit more relaxed, especially down in the outfield. The prices are cheaper, but if it rained during the day, you better bring your own chair or a tarp to sit on, or else your pants might get wet.
 

A night at Constellation Field watching a baseball game is a fun night for everyone, but if it rained during the day, you better bring a tarp to sit on, or else your pants might get wet. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

The Dome in the Woods

Walking around Washington D.C. is quite the experience. Everywhere you turn are beautiful buildings and history around every corner. Walking toward Union Station, I turned back to look at the Capitol, where we had been earlier that afternoon. You could just see the dome through the trees. 
 

Waling around Washington D.C. is quite the experience. Everywhere you turn are beautiful buildings and history around every corner. Walking toward Union Station, I turned back to look at the Capitol, where we had been earlier that afternoon. You could just see the dome through the trees. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

All American Angel

The Navy’s Blue Angels and the Air Force’s Thunderbirds are a symbol of our military’s capability and can-do attitude. The Pensacola Naval Air Station is the home of the Blue Angels. At the National Naval Aviation Museum, you can learn more about the “Blue’s” and view previous versions of these great aircraft, as this one in Hanger Bay One. 

Find out more about the P2V-1 Neptune, aka the Truculent Turtle hanging from behind here.

 

The Navy's Blue Angels and the Air Force's Thunderbirds are a symbol of our military's capability and can-do attitude. The Pensacola Naval Air Station is the home of the Blue Angels. At the National Naval Aviation Museum, you can learn more about the Blues and view previous versions of these great aircraft, like this one in Hanger Bay One. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.