A View from the Cockpit

I always get a bit envious when I get an opportunity to view an airplane’s cockpit. Always wanting to be a pilot, it’s fun to view the instruments and silently pretend that I’m the one at the controls. Old or new, large or small, an airplane’s cockpit is where I would enjoy spending a few hours flying over the landscape far below. In the meantime, I’ll have to settle for the cramped quarters of coach seating, somewhere in the back.

This is a view from the Lockheed Lodestar on the tarmac at Hobby Airport in Houston by the 1940 Air Terminal Museum. The HDR sequence really worked well here, as the outside exposure was much brighter than the dark interior. An individual exposure with existing light would not be capable of obtaining an image like this.

 

This is a view from the Lockheed Lodestar on the tarmac at Hobby Airport in Houston by the 1940 Air Terminal Museum. The HDR sequence really worked well here, as the outside exposure was much brighter than the dark interior. An individual exposure with existing light would not be capable of obtaining an image like this. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

 

Purplely Flowers

Okay, before you start in on me about the title, I know that’s not a word. At least I don’t think it is. But I couldn’t think of anything else when I sat down to write about this photo. I’m not a botanist and couldn’t find a similar flower with an internet search. So, I’m leaving it up to you to let me know what the type of flower this is.

This purplely flower is part of the lovely flowers in Claude Monet’s garden in Giverny, France. There were so many to choose from to shoot, but I had to stop and take some family photos too. So you can blame them that I don’t have more pretty, colorful flowers to show.

 

This purplely flower is part of the lovely flowers in Claude Monet's garden in Giverny, France. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

 

Old Hi-Tech

As you peer upon this photo of an old typewriter, I am writing this blog with voice dictation only. I am touching no keys. No, it’s not perfect as I had to go back and correct a few words, but it sure beats typing. All this just goes to show you that technology continues to move forward. But I recall a day during my middle school years, when I first typed on an old manual typewriter. It was clunky and slow, but little did I know how it would affect my future.  It was probably my most valuable class during those years.

This 1955 Smith Corona office typewriter was high tech for its day and many secretaries spent hours sitting in front of its keys. Today most people would compare this to a rotary dial telephone.  Now, it’s more of a novelty item than a real tool. But it fits perfectly in this old office on exhibition at the 1940 Air Terminal Museum in Houston.
 

This 1955 Smith Corona office typewriter was high tech for its day and many secretaries spent hours sitting in front of its keys. Today most people would compare this to a rotary dial telephone.  It's more of a novelty item than a real tool. But it fits perfectly in this old office on exhibition at the 1940 Air Terminal Museum in Houston. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

 

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Queen Anne’s Statue

There is a group of white marble figures that stand in front of St. Paul’s Cathedral in London. This group with Queen Anne, surrounded below by figures representing England, France, Ireland, and the North American Colonies is an exact replica of a group originally created in 1712.
 
The original creation sat for many years in a disgraceful state of neglect, with the Queen’s nose chipped off, and several legs and arms missing. The whole composition was cleared away, and an entirely new one put in its place in the late 1800s. The old lady is starting to show some wear again, but she still stands proudly above the four other figures.
 
 

The Eye of Sauron

If you have read or watched the Lord of the Rings trilogy, then you are familiar with the Eye of Sauron. It was an eye, rimmed with fire, high on a tower that could see throughout the land.

In many ways, a sunset is like the eye, but it knows it has only moments left to gaze upon the land before it drops below the horizon. Not to worry though, as it returns the following morning to return watch over its kingdom.

 

 

The Mini Wright Flyer

The Wright Flyer was the first successful powered aircraft. The Wright brothers flew it four times on December 17, 1903 near the Kill Devil Hills, about four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. This large model was found at the 1940 Air Terminal Museum. Recently, I forgot what time they opened and arrived an hour early. They were kind enough to allow me inside, where I was able to shoot some interior shots without a crowd. 
 

This large model of the Wright Flyer was found at the 1940 Air Terminal Museum. Recently, I forgot what time they opened and arrived an hour early. They were kind enough to allow me inside, where I was able to shoot some interior shots without a crowd.

  

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Impressions of Monet

Claude Monet was a maverick. He went against the grain.

When this french painter first traveled to Paris to visit the Louvre, he witnessed painters copying from the old masters. Having brought his paints and other tools with him, he would instead go and sit by a window and paint what he saw. This was unheard of back in the 1800s. His style of painting helped to lead a new approach to art, painting the effects of light in the open air with broken color and rapid brushstrokes, in what later became known as Impressionism.

This image, processed with an impressionistic style, is his own gardens and pond in Giverny, France. Many of his paintings contained this pond with its water lilies, row boats and bridge. We bought a poster of a painting of his many years ago at a garage sale, but never fathomed that we would one day travel to that exact spot.
 

This image, processed with an impressionistic style of Claude Monet, is his own gardens and pond in Giverny, France. Many of his paintings contained this pond with its water lilies, row boats and bridge. We bought a poster of a painting of his many years ago at a garage sale, but never fathomed that we would one day travel to that exact spot. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.