Outside St. Mary de Castro

This little church on the grounds of Dover Castle in England is St. Mary de Castro. The present Saxon period church was built on the Eastern Heights around AD1000 inside the castle walls. Walking up to it for the first time, I wasn’t really expecting much, but inside, it was quite  impressive. It’s another wonderful example of the great surprises you find when visiting Dover Castle.
  

This little church on the grounds of Dover Castle in England is St. Mary de Castro. The present Saxon period church was built on the Eastern Heights around AD1000 inside the castle walls. Walking up to it for the first time, I wasn't really expecting much but inside, it was quite  impressive. It's another example of the great surprises you find when visiting Dover Castle. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

 

Reaching for a Snack

Driving through the country, it’s not uncommon to see a cow reaching its head through a fence to get a piece of tasty grass growing tall outside the pasture. In the case of this pachyderm, the tasty hay was up high and slightly boxed in. It was something to see this guy use his trunk to twist the hay out the side of the wires and pull out a huge clump to munch. Watching the end of the trunk feel around the box where he couldn’t see and twist the hay out was amusing. The reward must have been worth it, because he seemed to be having a good time.

 

It was something to see this elephant use his trunk to twist the hay out the side of the wires and pull out a huge clump to munch. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

 

Inside Canterbury Cathedral

Traveling in England, we spent a half day in Canterbury. The small shops and restaurants lining the small streets have a distinct European flare. You could spend a day just window shopping and trying the local treats and sweets. But the main event not to be missed was Canterbury Cathedral. Like most of our stops, it was way too short. I could have spent half a day just soaking in the atmosphere and tremendous size of this church.

This is the main nave, looking west to the choir screen in the distant center. The doorway leads to another area where the choir sits, all built above a large crypt underground.

You could spend a day just window shopping and trying the local treats and sweets. But the main event not to be missed was Canterbury Cathedral. Like most of our stops, it was way too short. I could have spent half a day just soaking in the atmosphere and tremendous size of this church. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

 

A Little Piece of Heaven

Everyone has their favorite “happy place”. For some, it’s a big comfy chair in front of the football game, or maybe high atop a mountain looking down on everything else. Over the years, my family has taken annual trips to the beach in Florida to unwind and relax. I’ve come to appreciate the soft breeze, relaxing sound of the surf and a nice deck to kick back and nap or read a book. Sure, there might be a more perfect spot, but you have to admit, you could do a lot worse.

 

I've come to appreciate the soft breeze, relaxing sound of the surf and a nice deck to kick back and rest, like this large deck with the two blue chairs. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

 

The Tower of the Five Orders

The Bodleian Library occupies a group of five buildings near Broad Street in Oxford, England, and a large number of off-site storage areas. One of the more unique buildings is the  Radcliffe Camera. Next door to it is the Schools Quadrangle. Its tower forms the main entrance to the Bodelian Library and is known as the Tower of the Five Orders. The Tower is so named because it is ornamented, in ascending order, with the columns of each of the five orders of classical architecture: Tuscan, Doric, Ionic, Corinthian and Composite.

The Tower is just another great example of the wonderful architecture to be found in Oxford.

 

The tall tower of the Schools Quadrangle in Oxford, forms the main entrance to the Bodelian Library and is known as the Tower of the Five Orders. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography

 

Prepping for the Livestock Show

Visiting a livestock show is an interesting event on several points. There is the smell when you first walk in. Don’t worry, you get used to it. Sort of. Then there is all the activity of people and animals walking here and there. You have to be careful where you step, if you know what I mean. There are always vendors selling farm and livestock related goods, the type of things you just can’t buy at Walmart. So there are lots of things to see and watch.

Many animals have been raised and are shown by high school students in local farm clubs. You can tell they have spent many hours working toward this one day of showing off their livestock. This calf is getting a quick touch-up before its showing at the Houston Livestock Show last year. 
  

Students have spent many hours working toward this one day of showing off their livestock. This calf is getting a quick touch-up for the Houston Livestock Show last year. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

 

 

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Douglas A-3 Skywarrior

“The Douglas A-3 Skywarrior was originally designed as a strategic bomber for the United States Navy and was among the longest serving carrier-based jet aircraft in history. It entered service in the mid-1950s and was retired in 1991. For many years, it was also the heaviest aircraft to operate from an aircraft carrier, earning it the unofficial nickname “The Whale”. Its primary function for much of its later service life was as an electronic warfare platform, tactical air reconnaissance platform, and high capacity aerial refueling tanker.“(Wikipedia)

On june 30, June 2011, the last flyable  Skywarrior, arrived at NAS Pensacola, Florida for retirement at the National Naval Aviation Museum. It is now on display in front of Hanger Bay One.

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