Saying Goodbye to 2011

2011 has been a great year for so many reasons. Speaking strictly on photography, it was the year I started shooting again, due to my interest in HDR. I’ve learned a lot  on the subject and hope to continue in the coming year.

I’ve been fortunate to travel out of town a few times, which allowed me opportunities to shoot some new sites and subjects. But I think it’s the daily challenge of finding something local that will ultimately make me a better photographer.

This blog has afforded me an opportunity to share some of my favorite images and is an incentive to continue broadening my “exposure” to new subjects and styles of shooting. Your comments here, on Facebook and Google+ are a great encouragement and very much appreciated. I look forward to hearing from you as we continue this photographic journey together.

Goodbye 2011. Hello 2012.

2011 has been a great year for so many reasons. I've learned a lot about photography and hope to continue learning in the coming year. Goodbye 2011. Hello 2012. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

Holiday Glitter

I find that when I “think” photography, I find more opportunities and subjects to shoot. I get lazy frequently and I’m sure I miss many great subjects to take. But when I purpose to “think photos”, I “see” more and come home with photos from an event or outing that I wouldn’t have considered a photo opportunity.

We were waiting for a table last night at a restaurant and were standing by their Christmas tree. Having just my iPhone, I thought I might chance a few photos. I’m sure a few folks thought I was silly for shooting an ornament, but I thought it turned out okay. Besides, it wouldn’t be the first time I’ve been accused of being silly.
We were waiting for a table last night at a restaurant and were standing by their Christmas tree. Having just my iPhone, I thought I might chance a few photos. I'm sure a few folks thought I was silly for shooting an ornament, but I thought it turned out okay. Holiday Glitter

Learning Something New

The more you work at a hobby, the better you get – hopefully. This is one of my early attempts last spring trying HDR photos. HDR, along with nighttime exposures, bring out details that the eye alone can’t see. A wide-angle lens makes this yard look larger than it really is, plus the movement of the clouds during the exposure gives the sky a surreal feel.

Maybe it’s the unexpected surprises like this that I enjoy so much about HDR and nighttime photography. 
  

The more you work at a hobby, the better you get  (hopefully). This is one of my early attempts last spring trying HDR photos. HDR, along with nighttime exposures, brought out details that the eye alone can't see. A wide-angle lens make this yard look larger than it really is, plus the movement of the clouds during the exposure gives the sky a surreal feel.Maybe it's the unexpected surprises like this that I enjoy so much about HDR and nighttime photography. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

Capt’n Fun

Sometimes you see something out of context and you have to blink and look again to see if you saw what you think you saw. Imagine the first time I saw a Volkswagon sitting atop a roof. Such is the case on this island shopping area in Pensacola. Souvenir shops  come up with all kinds of ways to draw the customers and this tactic seems to work pretty good.
Sometimes you see something out of context and you have to blink and look again to see if you saw what you think you saw. Imagine the first time I saw a Volkswagon sitting atop a roof. Such is the case on this island shopping area in Pensacola.  Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

The Wheels Half

This is the other half of the Wings and Wheels get-together each month for the Wings and Wheels at the 1940 Air Terminal Museum in Houston. In the parking lot you will find some really nice wheels, while on the tarmac, you will find some really nice wings. So whether your interest is on or above ground, there is something to catch your eye.

Get there early, so you can catch your photos without too many crowds. Your kids can watch the big commercial jets come and go, while you look at the cool stuff too.

 

This is the other half of the Wings and Wheels get-together each month for the Wings and Wheels at the 1940 Air Terminal Museum in Houston. In the parking lot you will find some really nice wheels, while on the tarmac, you will find some really nice wings. So whether your interest is on or above ground, there is something to catch your eye.Get there early, so you can catch your photos without too many crowds. Your kids can watch the big commercial jets come and go, while you look at the cool stuff too. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

The Tin Goose

The Ford Trimotor (nicknamed “The Tin Goose”) was an all-metal, American three-engined transport plane that was first produced in 1925 by the companies of Henry Ford . Newer designs and Ford’s losing interest in aviation caused production to end in 1933, with 199 airplanes built and flown world-wide by commercial and military aviation. I’m almost certain that Indiana Jones flew on one too.

This Trimotor hangs in the Smithsonian’s Air and Space Museum in Washington D.C.

 

The Tin Goose was the nickname of the The Ford Trimotor.

The Star

Stars come in all shapes and sizes, colors and brightness. But the most famous one of all can be found in Matthew 2:1-2

… behold, wise men from the east came to Jerusalem, saying, “Where is he who has been born king of the Jews? For we saw his star when it rose and have come to worship him.” 

This is the day we celebrate the birth of Jesus. “For the Son of Man came to seek and to save what was lost.”  Merry Christmas everyone!

 

A large Christmas tree stands in front of City Hall in Sugar Land, Texas.