Cancer Survivors Plaza

Driving around town at 50 mph, you have a tendency of noticing only the car in front of you. Seldom do you have the time to peek through the trees to see what’s hiding. That’s one reason why I like photo walks.

Photo walks allow you to take your time and see things you didn’t know were there or from a new or unique point of view . I recently went downtown to shoot some fountains and discovered the Richard and Annette Bloch Cancer Survivors Plaza. It’s a nice plaza, nestled in some trees right alongside Fannin Street.

Looking it up on the net, I discovered these can be found in many cities. Each contain 7 plaques that talk of the Road to Recovery, offering common sense suggestions on fighting cancer. You can find more about them here. It’s a nice place to sit quietly, pray or reflect on things important to you. There’s a nice fountain in the center also. It’s a very short walk from the Natural Science Museum too.

 

I recently went downtown to shoot some fountains and discovered the Richard and Annette Bloch Cancer Survivors Plaza. It's a nice plaza, nestled in some trees. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

Starship Enterprise

Space: the final frontier. These are the voyages of the starship Enterprise. Its five-year mission: to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no man has gone before.

That was the voyage of the Starship Enterprise.  The actual “starship” from the original Star Trek television series is an eleven foot model that now rests in a large glass case in the lower level of the Air and Space Museum in Washington D.C.

You have to fight your way through the souvenir shop, find the stairs to the lower level, then go to the very back to find it amid all the cheap toys. It has no special lighting, and with the external glare on the case, was very hard to photograph. Not to mention that it looked a bit tired or dirty.  It just didn’t seem like a fitting place for one of the most famous science fiction icons in the world.

Fitting or not, it still feels larger than life as you imagine Captain Kirk aboard , “to boldly go where no man has gone  before.” 

Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

Wurlitzer

Small diners are great. They’re full of atmosphere, good food and if you’re lucky, a jukebox. The coffee shop across from my high school had one and I still remember the songs it used to play. I bet most people have a favorite memory of some place that had a juke box. Do you?

Back in 1953, my grand-parents opened a small restaurant in Orange, VA. My mother, still in high school, was a waitress there. It’s during that era she met a young guy back from the Army. And all during this time you could hear the top tunes of the day playing in the background off of this Wurlitzer jukebox. It left the family for many years, but they were able to track it down, bring it home and have it restored.

Care to guess what model it is?

Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

Flying Over Liberty

There is a continuous sense of pride and awe as you travel around Washington D.C.  That feeling is amplified at night as the monuments are lit with a dramatic flair. 

We had walked through rain from the Lincoln Memorial and were almost to the Washington Monument when it finally cleared. As I looked back at Lincoln and past the World War II Memorial, you could see the planes flying overhead toward Reagan National Airport. It was a quiet and solemn moment, as we were alone amidst the great monuments honoring our nations heroes. 

Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

Sam Houston

Every school child in the state of Texas knows who Sam Houston is. Born in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, he later became the Governor of Tennessee, then defeated the Mexican army at San Jacinto to win Texas’ independence. He  became the first and third President of the Republic of Texas, U.S. Senator for Texas after it joined the United States, and finally as governor of the state. 

 He is honored throughout the state of Texas in many ways. The city of Houston is named after him as well as a memorial museum, a U.S. Army base, a national forest, a historical park, a university, and the largest free-standing statue of an American.  That’s not including a slew of schools named after him too. This statue is located in Herman Park, close to downtown Houston.

Every school child in the state of Texas knows who Sam Houston is. Photo by Tim Stanley.

Kemah

North of  Galveston and south of the Houston Ship Channel lies the suburb of Kemah. Most of us know it for the waterway that opens up into Clear Lake and for the Kemah Boardwalk.

It’s a great place for family entertainment and great seafood, plus the boardwalk affords a nice view to watch the boats come and go from Clear Lake. When you go, don’t be in a hurry. There’s too much to see and do.

Between Galveston and the Houston Ship Channel lies the suburb of Kemah. Most of us know it for the waterway that opens up into Clear Lake and for the Kemah Boardwalk. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

Shade by the Lake

Few folks can resist the sound of soft flowing water, but throw in some nice shade trees and fountains, and you have the makings of a great rest area.  If I officed at the building by this park, I’d be outside with a laptop under the tree. I wonder if the wi-fi works that far?

Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.