Allen Center Sculpture

Houston, like many large cities, has interesting artwork and sculptures adorning their streets and buildings. This sculpture is located by Allen Center. I’m not sure of the name. Maybe someone can comment and let us know. Whatever the name, it’s a great addition to the contemporary style of architecture in that part of town.

Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

Stir-Fry

lt was a busy morning at work and some friends wanted to go to lunch. Someone suggests Mongolian stir-fry. Huh? Say what? I’m thinking burgers, sub sandwich or other regular lunch fare. I’m up for an adventure (oh boy) so I go along. It’s one of those new style places where you assemble your order in a cafeteria style line, then they cook it all for you and deliver it to your table. Wow. I was pleasantly surprised with large portions and really good food.

While we ate, we talked a little photography and I noticed the brick wall with all the great textures and back-lit sign. So, like a nerd, I stand up and take an iPhone photo of their cool sign, thinking I might use it later. Well, this is later. The fact that I like lights had absolutely no bearing on me taking this photo. Okay, almost none.

Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

Noon Whistle Pottery

Small towns have some of the neatest stores. Old general stores, artist shops, eateries and more. On a recent vacation, we found ourselves with extra time one day and found this interesting shop. Okay, actually my wife said “pull over here, now.”  I’m not the kind of guy to look at knickknacks too long, so I found my way outside and started noticing the architecture and colors of this little shop. You might remember the old colorful pump in the lower left corner too.

This is another hand-held, three image HDR.

Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

Downtown Houston’s East Side

Walking around the stadium between innings, I was looking for something interesting to shoot. Looking from one of Minute Maid Park’s large windows, I saw how pretty the sky was this hot summer afternoon. We’ve had such little rain lately that I had to document that Houston still had clouds, sometimes.

Walking around the stadium between innings, I was looking for something interesting to shoot. Looking from one of Minute Maid Park's large windows, I saw how pretty the sky was this hot summer afternoon. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

Country Porch

Everyone likes a big front porch. There’s something about them that lowers your blood pressure and makes you want to slow down. Add a nice rocking chair and a beautiful view to the mix and you have a great combination for a relaxing evening. Now, where’s that bowl of ice cream?

This is another view from Grave’s Mountain Lodge in Virginia. Instead of only taking some pictures, I’m going to have to actually stay there sometime.

This is another view from Grave's Mountain Lodge in Virginia. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

Home Plate

During the last several decades, Houston has done a good job revitalizing the social side of downtown. One big addition was the Minute Maid Park for the Houston Astros. The architecture in this area of town is turn-of-the (previous) century and this establishment across the street seems to fit right in.

The architecture in the area of town is turn of the (previous) century and this establishment across the street seems to fit right in. PHoto by Tim Stanley Photography.

X-15 Rocket Plane

From my earliest memories as a child, I remember wanting to be an astronaut. I still do, but that’s another story. One of my first models I ever built as a young boy was the x-15 rocket plane. It was about the coolest thing I had ever seen.

Before there was a space shuttle, there was the X-15 “Rocket Plane”. Much of what was learned on vehicles like this was applied to the Space Shuttle program. Wikipedia states “The altitudes attained by the X-15 aircraft do not match that of Alan Shepard’s 1961 NASA space capsule flight nor subsequent NASA space capsules and space shuttle flights. However, the X-15 flights did reign supreme among rocket-powered aircraft until the second spaceflight of Space Ship One in 2004.

Eight different pilots actually received their astronaut wings, since they met the USAF spaceflight criteria by exceeding the altitude of 50 miles (80 km), thus qualifying the pilots for astronaut status. This predecessor to the Space Shuttle is the X-15A-1, one of the three ships built. It flew 82 powered flights and now rests in the National Air and Space Museum in Washington D.C.

Side note; the capsule on the floor below is the Command Module from Apollo 11.

This predecessor to the Space Shuttle is the X-15A-1, one of the three ships built. It flew 82 powered flights and now rests in the National Air and Space Museum in Washington D.C.