Fall-out from Pat O’Brien’s

Walking around the French Quarter, you always seemed to be dodging trash cans. The streets are not wide to start with and the clubs generate their fair share of waste. Since not everyone  is as tidy as they should be, the trash cans are not always used. Watching where you walk can be a full time event cruising through some areas.

 

Fall-out from Pat O'Brien's

Foggy Field Sunrise

The times I drive into work can vary from day to day, so catching a sunrise can be a bit tricky. What is even trickier is trying to photograph it without stopping. Not to worry though… I drive one of those four-lane roads, with center turn lane and wide shoulders, making it almost 6 lanes wides. On this morning, there was no traffic coming or going, so I could slow down and shoot out the driver’s window for a few brief seconds. Okay, maybe more than a few brief seconds.

A beautiful sunrise with clouds and a bit of fog, taken with my iPhone on the way to work. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

Tabasco Country

Avery Island, in New Iberia, Louisiana is the home of Tabasco. It’s the only place in the world where it is made, yet is sold world-wide. They have a small tour you can take of the plant, but the highlight of your visit will be their  country store where you can buy all things Tabasco, as well as taste tests of each of their current offerings.
Avery Island, in New Iberia, Louisiana is the home of Tabasco. It's the only place in the world where it is made, yet is sold world-wide. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

Entrance to the Grand Palais

Here is another view of the Grand Palais in Paris. It fits right in with the rest of the architectural style found throughout Paris and Europe, with the Roman influence of the large columns and the statues that rise above each entrance and corner of this spectacular building. Visit this site for a great animation of the the Grand Palais.

  

The Grand Palais in Paris fits right in with the rest of the architectural style found throughout Paris and Europe, with the Roman influence of the large columns and the statues that rise above each entrance and corner of this spectacular building.  Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

The French Quarter at Night

Anyone who has heard of New Orleans has heard of the French Quarter. It’s a unique part of town that has a character and feel all it’s own. It’s a part of town that never seems to sleep, unless of course you are there at 4:30 in the morning. That is about the time we arrived, long after and before the crowds that normally fill the street.

 It is also the oldest neighborhood in the city of New Orleans.  Most of the present-day historic buildings were constructed during the late 18th century, during the city’s period of Spanish rule, and reflect Spanish colonial architecture.

The French Quarter is the oldest neighborhood in the city of New Orleans.  Most of the present-day historic buildings were constructed during the late 18th century, during the city's period of Spanish rule, and reflect Spanish colonial architecture. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

Moody Garden’s Sea Horse

I have always enjoyed watching fish and in the past have owned several fish tanks. My first apartment had one wall covered in fish tanks. So when I take a trip to a large aquarium, like the one at Moody Gardens in Galveston, Texas. I get quite a kick out of the different tanks and exhibits. Taking photos of their occupants can be quite a challenge though.

Take this seahorse for example. He is just over an inch tall and moving in a poorly lit tank. I’m probably holding up the crowd (yes, I’m that guy) and trying not to get reflections from the glass.

Moody Garden's Sea Horse

Ft. Pike Overview

On our recent photo trip to New Orleans,  we were fortunate to photograph two 19th century forts. The first was Ft. Pike, named after Brigadier General Zebulon Montgomery Pike, which formerly guarded the Rigolets pass in Louisiana.

From Wikepedia…

The fort was built in 1818 to guard against British reinvasion of the United States. It came under the control of the Louisiana Continental Guard in 1861, just weeks before Louisiana joined the Confederacy. When Union forces captured New Orleans in 1862, the Confederate forces evacuated Fort Pike. The Union then reestablished control of the installation using it as a base for raids and also for training of United States Colored Troops.

The fort was abandoned in 1890, and was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972. Despite having changed hands multiple times in a history spanning at least two major wars, no cannon was ever fired in battle at Fort Pike.

Since it was early Friday morning, we were there before any visitors and we had the entire fort to ourselves, which made for some great shooting wide angle shots. Even then, we still managed to walk into each other’s shots.

 

Ft. Pike was named after Brigadier General Zebulon Montgomery Pike, which formerly guarded the Rigolets pass in Louisiana.  Photo by Tim Stanley Photography